Der Spiegel: Russia making concessions to Ukraine on Donbas situation

13:43, 25 May 2015
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The presence of Russian troops in Ukraine does not necessarily signal the Kremlin's intention to launch a new offensive in the Donbas, the Moscow correspondent of German weekly magazine Der Spiegel Christian Neef has said.

REUTERS

According to Neef, the Kremlin is looking for a way out of the conflict in the east of Ukraine, Polish Radio has reported the correspondent as saying.

In his article, Neef draws attention to recent statements by Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, who has claimed that the Kremlin is preparing to attack Ukraine again. The author attributes the reason for such "belligerent" statements by Poroshenko to the detention of two Russian soldiers of the Russian special services.

"It is well known that the Russian government has been sending troops to Ukraine and lies when denying it," the journalist writes. According to him, the presence of Russian troops does not necessarily signal the planning of a new offensive.

Instead, Neef said he believes that "Moscow is making concessions." As evidence, the journalist quoted Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, who said that the territory occupied by the separatists should remain a part of Ukraine and that there should be respect for President Poroshenko.

The publication pointed out that Russia, apparently, would abandon its “Novorossiya” to split off a portion of Ukrainian territory, as this has been the reason for Russia’s recent economic woes.

"Why would the Kremlin invest even more blood and treasure in Ukraine?" the German journalist argues.

As was reported earlier, Alexander Alexandrov, one of the Russian special forces soldiers Ukraine says it detained in Luhansk, has told Ukrainian security, the OSCE, and the Russian press that the Russian army is present in the area of ​​anti-terrorist operation implementation in Ukraine’s Donbas.

The Kremlin denies that it has sent soldiers into Ukraine, but a large and ever-growing body of circumstantial evidence makes Moscow’s denials scarcely credible.

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