Ukraine in draft list of countries whose citizens could be allowed to enter EU once borders reopen – media

11:00, 26 June 2020
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There are two lists, one for those that will be accepted, and one for those who will not, Euronews reports.

The list has already aroused controversy after sources revealed that the United States – the worst-affected country worldwide by COVID-19 with more than 2.4 million cases, is on the latter list.

At the same time, Ukraine is in the green zone.

On Thursday, European officials failed to reach a decision on which countries will be barred from entry after the bloc's external borders open, with an EU diplomat telling Euronews that officials "could not reach an agreement" and that talks would continue into Friday.

Read alsoEuropean Commission publishes criteria for reopening borders for third countries

Euronews has obtained, from EU diplomatic sources, the full draft list of the countries for which Europe's borders will be open, and can confirm what we reported on Wednesday that Brazil, Qatar, the U.S. and Russia are indeed not on the approved list.

Sources also threw into doubt the border reopening date of July 1, suggesting agreements will not be forthcoming in time.

The full list of countries whose nationals will be allowed to enter Europe according to the draft list is as follows:

Vatican City, Monaco, Montenegro, Andorra, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ukraine, Albania, Turkey, Kosovo, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Turkmenistan, Vietnam, China, Thailand, Myanmar, Mongolia, Japan, South Korea, Georgia, Bhutan, Lebanon, Indonesia, Uzbekistan, India, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Palau, New Zealand, Australia, Dominica, Bahamas, Saint Lucia, Uruguay, Jamaica, Cuba, Guyana, Paraguay, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Canada, Angola, Tunisia, Namibia, Uganda, Mozambique, Mauritius, Zambia, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt.

Diplomatic sources also hinted to Euronews that there is disagreement between nations on the criteria to use for this decision, with some maintaining that data about COVID rates is not reliable.

When EU guidelines were released two weeks ago officials said the list would take into account the infection rate in countries concerned.

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